Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

JAMA. 2018 Feb 6;319(5):474-482. doi: 10.1001/jama.2017.21896.

Prevalence of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders in 4 US Communities.

Author information

1
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill.
2
University of New Mexico, Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse and Addictions, Albuquerque.
3
University of California San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla.
4
Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego, San Diego, California.
5
Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
6
State University of New York Buffalo School of Medicine, Buffalo.
7
University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle.
8
University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha.
9
Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
10
Avera McKennan Hospital and University Health Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.
11
Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
12
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, Maryland.
13
San Diego State University, Center for Behavioral Teratology, San Diego, California.
14
VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts.
15
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
16
Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.
17
University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson.
18
Sanford Research, University of South Dakota Sanford School of Medicine, Vermillion.

Abstract

Importance:

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders are costly, life-long disabilities. Older data suggested the prevalence of the disorder in the United States was 10 per 1000 children; however, there are few current estimates based on larger, diverse US population samples.

Objective:

To estimate the prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, including fetal alcohol syndrome, partial fetal alcohol syndrome, and alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder, in 4 regions of the United States.

Design, Setting, and Participants:

Active case ascertainment methods using a cross-sectional design were used to assess children for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders between 2010 and 2016. Children were systematically assessed in the 4 domains that contribute to the fetal alcohol spectrum disorder continuum: dysmorphic features, physical growth, neurobehavioral development, and prenatal alcohol exposure. The settings were 4 communities in the Rocky Mountain, Midwestern, Southeastern, and Pacific Southwestern regions of the United States. First-grade children and their parents or guardians were enrolled.

Exposures:

Alcohol consumption during pregnancy.

Main Outcomes and Measures:

Prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in the 4 communities was the main outcome. Conservative estimates for the prevalence of the disorder and 95% CIs were calculated using the eligible first-grade population as the denominator. Weighted prevalences and 95% CIs were also estimated, accounting for the sampling schemes and using data restricted to children who received a full evaluation.

Results:

A total of 6639 children were selected for participation from a population of 13 146 first-graders (boys, 51.9%; mean age, 6.7 years [SD, 0.41] and white maternal race, 79.3%). A total of 222 cases of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders were identified. The conservative prevalence estimates for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders ranged from 11.3 (95% CI, 7.8-15.8) to 50.0 (95% CI, 39.9-61.7) per 1000 children. The weighted prevalence estimates for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders ranged from 31.1 (95% CI, 16.1-54.0) to 98.5 (95% CI, 57.5-139.5) per 1000 children.

Conclusions and Relevance:

Estimated prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders among first-graders in 4 US communities ranged from 1.1% to 5.0% using a conservative approach. These findings may represent more accurate US prevalence estimates than previous studies but may not be generalizable to all communities.

PMID:
29411031
PMCID:
PMC5839298
DOI:
10.1001/jama.2017.21896
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center