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Cell. 2018 Sep 6;174(6):1406-1423.e16. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2018.08.047.

Post-Antibiotic Gut Mucosal Microbiome Reconstitution Is Impaired by Probiotics and Improved by Autologous FMT.

Author information

1
Immunology Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, 7610001 Rehovot, Israel.
2
Immunology Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, 7610001 Rehovot, Israel; Internal Medicine Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6423906 Tel Aviv, Israel.
3
Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 7610001 Rehovot, Israel.
4
Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 7610001 Rehovot, Israel; Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 7610001 Rehovot, Israel.
5
Department of Veterinary Resources, Weizmann Institute of Science, 7610001 Rehovot, Israel.
6
Department of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6423906 Tel Aviv, Israel; Research Center for Digestive tract and Liver Diseases, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6423906 Tel Aviv, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, 6997801 Tel Aviv, Israel.
7
Migal Galilee Research Institute, 11016 Kiryat Shmona, Israel; Tel Hai College, Upper Galilee, 1220800, Israel.
8
Department of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6423906 Tel Aviv, Israel; Research Center for Digestive tract and Liver Diseases, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, 6423906 Tel Aviv, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, 6997801 Tel Aviv, Israel. Electronic address: zamir@tlvmc.gov.il.
9
Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 7610001 Rehovot, Israel; Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 7610001 Rehovot, Israel. Electronic address: eran.segal@weizmann.ac.il.
10
Immunology Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, 7610001 Rehovot, Israel. Electronic address: eran.elinav@weizmann.ac.il.

Abstract

Probiotics are widely prescribed for prevention of antibiotics-associated dysbiosis and related adverse effects. However, probiotic impact on post-antibiotic reconstitution of the gut mucosal host-microbiome niche remains elusive. We invasively examined the effects of multi-strain probiotics or autologous fecal microbiome transplantation (aFMT) on post-antibiotic reconstitution of the murine and human mucosal microbiome niche. Contrary to homeostasis, antibiotic perturbation enhanced probiotics colonization in the human mucosa but only mildly improved colonization in mice. Compared to spontaneous post-antibiotic recovery, probiotics induced a markedly delayed and persistently incomplete indigenous stool/mucosal microbiome reconstitution and host transcriptome recovery toward homeostatic configuration, while aFMT induced a rapid and near-complete recovery within days of administration. In vitro, Lactobacillus-secreted soluble factors contributed to probiotics-induced microbiome inhibition. Collectively, potential post-antibiotic probiotic benefits may be offset by a compromised gut mucosal recovery, highlighting a need of developing aFMT or personalized probiotic approaches achieving mucosal protection without compromising microbiome recolonization in the antibiotics-perturbed host.

KEYWORDS:

Probiotics; antibiotics; microbiome

PMID:
30193113
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2018.08.047

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