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ACS Nano. 2017 May 23;11(5):4660-4668. doi: 10.1021/acsnano.7b00413. Epub 2017 May 8.

Selective Photomechanical Detachment and Retrieval of Divided Sister Cells from Enclosed Microfluidics for Downstream Analyses.

Author information

1
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan , 1301 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122, United States.
2
Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan , 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, United States.
3
School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University , Suwon 440-746, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University , Suwon 440-746, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan , 2350 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, United States.
6
Department of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology , 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 01811, Republic of Korea.
7
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan , 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2099, United States.
8
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States.

Abstract

Considerable evidence suggests that self-renewal and differentiation of cancer stem-like cells, a key cell population in tumorgenesis, can determine the outcome of disease. Though the development of microfluidics has enhanced the study of cellular lineage, it remains challenging to retrieve sister cells separately inside enclosed microfluidics for further analyses. In this work, we developed a photomechanical method to selectively detach and reliably retrieve target cells from enclosed microfluidic chambers. Cells cultured on carbon nanotube-polydimethylsiloxane composite surfaces can be detached using shear force induced through irradiation of a nanosecond-pulsed laser. This retrieval process has been verified to preserve cell viability, membrane proteins, and mRNA expression levels. Using the presented method, we have successfully performed 96-plex single-cell transcriptome analysis on sister cells in order to identify the genes altered during self-renewal and differentiation, demonstrating phenomenal resolution in the study of cellular lineage.

KEYWORDS:

carbon nanotube; cell detachment; cell retrieval; microfluidics; photoacoustics; single-cell transcriptome analysis

PMID:
28480715
DOI:
10.1021/acsnano.7b00413

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