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Eur J Radiol. 2007 May;62(2):170-4. Epub 2007 Mar 26.

Percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct strictures.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, University Hospital, I.P.Pavlova 6, 775 20 Olomouc, Czech Republic. martin.kocher@seznam.cz

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate long-term results of treatment of benign bile duct strictures.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

From February 1994 to November 2005, 21 patients (9 men, 12 women) with median age of 50.6 years (range 27-77 years) were indicated to percutaneous treatment of benign bile duct stricture. Stricture of hepatic ducts junction resulting from thermic injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy was indication for treatment in one patient, stricture of hepaticojejunostomy was indication for treatment in all other patients. Clinical symptoms (obstructive jaundice, anicteric cholestasis, cholangitis or biliary cirrhosis) have appeared from 3 months to 12 years after surgery.

RESULTS:

Initial internal/external biliary drainage was successful in 20 patients out of 21. These 20 patients after successful initial drainage were treated by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage. Sixteen patients were symptoms free during the follow-up. The relapse of clinical symptoms has appeared in four patients 9, 12, 14 and 24 months after treatment. One year primary clinical success rate of treatment for benign bile duct stricture was 94%. Additional two patients are symptoms free after redilatation (15 and 45 months). One patient is still in treatment, one patient died during secondary treatment period without interrelation with biliary intervention. The secondary clinical success rate is 100%.

CONCLUSION:

Benign bile duct strictures of hepatic ducts junction or biliary-enteric anastomosis are difficult to treat surgically and endoscopically inaccessible. Percutaneous treatment by balloon dilatation and long-term internal/external drainage is feasible in the majority of these patients. It is minimally invasive, safe and effective.

PMID:
17383840
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejrad.2007.01.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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