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J Feline Med Surg. 2019 Jan 21:1098612X18823584. doi: 10.1177/1098612X18823584. [Epub ahead of print]

Feline chronic gingivostomatitis is more prevalent in shared households and its risk correlates with the number of cohabiting cats.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to determine whether feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCGS) is more prevalent in shared vs single-cat households, whether the number of cohabiting cats or outdoor access represent risk factors for FCGS and whether the number of cohabiting cats is a useful prognostic indicator for standard surgical treatment.

METHODS:

Cats diagnosed with FCGS (study group) in the past 5 years at a referral institution were identified. The number of cohabiting cats, outdoor access, number of other cohabiting cats diagnosed with FCGS, ⩾6 month surgical outcome, when applicable, and historical signs of upper respiratory disease among any of the cohabiting cats, as well as patient demographic information, were recorded. Data were collected from medical records and by means of a telephone interview with the owners. The same information was collected from a group of cats of similar demographic characteristics diagnosed with periodontal disease but free of FCGS (control group).

RESULTS:

Seventy-six cats were included, of which 36 (47%) had FCGS and 40 (53%) served as controls. Bivariate analysis showed that cats with FCGS were significantly more likely to come from shared households, and had significantly more total cats per household compared with controls. Multivariate analysis also showed that cats in shared households had a significantly increased odds of FCGS compared with those from single-cat households. Historical signs of upper respiratory disease and outdoor access among cats within the same household were not associated with FCGS. The number of cohabiting cats was not associated with surgical outcome.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

Cats with FCGS are more likely to live in shared households. The risk of FCGS correlates with the number of cohabiting cats. The epidemiological features of FCGS may support an infectious etiology. The number of cohabiting cats within a household is not a useful prognostic indicator for standard surgical treatment of FCGS.

KEYWORDS:

Feline chronic gingivostomatitis; infectious disease; multi-cat household; outdoor access; prognostic indicator; risk factors; shared household; single-cat household; surgical outcome

PMID:
30663939
DOI:
10.1177/1098612X18823584

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