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Patient. 2018 Feb;11(1):119-129. doi: 10.1007/s40271-017-0276-2.

Patient Evaluation of Satisfaction and Outcomes with an Autoinjector for Self-Administration of Subcutaneous Belimumab in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

Author information

1
Evidera, Bethesda, MD, USA. Ebony.Dashiell-Aje@fda.hhs.gov.
2
, 10903 New Hampshire Ave, Silver Spring, MD, 20993, USA. Ebony.Dashiell-Aje@fda.hhs.gov.
3
Evidera, Bethesda, MD, USA.
4
Value Evidence and Outcomes, GlaxoSmithKline, London, UK.
5
GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, PA, USA.
6
Value Evidence and Outcomes, GlaxoSmithKline, King of Prussia, PA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study assessed patient experiences of using an autoinjector device to self-administer subcutaneous belimumab for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Satisfaction, ease and convenience of use, and confidence with the device were assessed, in addition to overall experience with belimumab.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional study was conducted among patients who completed a phase IIb open-label, multi-dose usability, tolerability, and safety study of subcutaneous belimumab (NCT02124798), in which patients receiving intravenous belimumab or subcutaneous belimumab using a prefilled syringe were switched to eight weekly self-administered doses of subcutaneous belimumab using the autoinjector. This follow-up study comprised an online/paper questionnaire and qualitative telephone interviews.

RESULTS:

In total, 43 patients receiving belimumab completed the questionnaire, 21 of whom also completed a follow-up telephone interview. Qualitative interviews indicated that 17 of 21 (81%) patients had a positive experience using the autoinjector; all patients considered the autoinjector to be convenient. Of the 42 patients who switched from intravenous belimumab to the autoinjector, 32 (76%) expressed a preference for the autoinjector over intravenous administration; reasons included convenience, time saved, cost, and reduced injection pain. The most commonly reported disadvantage of the autoinjector was injection discomfort (n = 5 [24%]; qualitative interview). Compared with intravenous administration, the autoinjector improved ability to work (17 of 29 [59%] of those employed) and carry out daily activities (40%).

CONCLUSION:

Patients with SLE reported high levels of satisfaction with the belimumab autoinjector and preferred the autoinjector to intravenous administration, citing advantages such as time saved, cost, and improved ability to work and carry out daily activities.

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