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Fertil Steril. 2018 Feb;109(2):315-323. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2017.10.009. Epub 2018 Jan 17.

Parental health status and infant outcomes: Upstate KIDS Study.

Author information

1
Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland. Electronic address: louisg@mail.nih.gov.
2
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, and Department of Epidemiology, and Department of Biostatistics, University at Albany School of Public Health, One University Place, Rensselaer, New York.
3
Gloltec, Inc., Rockville, Maryland.
4
Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland.
5
Epidemiology Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess parental health status inclusive of infertility and infant outcomes.

DESIGN:

Birth cohort with cross-sectional analysis of parental health status and infant outcomes.

SETTING:

Not applicable.

PATIENT(S):

Parents (n = 4,886) and infants (n = 5,845) participating in the Upstate KIDS birth cohort.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Infertility was defined as [1] sexually active without contraception for 1+ years without pregnancy, [2] ever requiring ≥12 months to become pregnant, and [3] requiring ≥12 months for index pregnancy. Multivariable linear regression with generalized estimating equations estimated the change (β coefficient and 95% confidence interval [CI]) in infant outcomes (gestation, birthweight, length, head circumference, ponderal index) and relative to each disease, including infertility after adjusting for age, body mass index, and infertility treatment.

RESULT(S):

Prevalence of parental chronic diseases ranged from <1% to 19%, and 21% to 54% for infertility. Maternal hypertension was negatively associated with gestation (β, -0.64; 95% CI, -1.03, -0.25) and birthweight (-151.98; -262.30, -41.67) as was asthma and birthweight (-75.01; -130.40, -19.62). Maternal kidney disease was associated with smaller head circumference (-1.09; -2.17, -0.01), whereas paternal autoimmune disease was associated with larger head circumference (0.87; 0.15, 1.60). Infertility was negatively associated with birthweight (-62.18; -103.78, -20.58), length (-0.33; -0.60, -0.06), and head circumference (-0.35; -0.67, -0.03).

CONCLUSION(S):

Infertility was significantly associated with reduced infant size even after accounting for infertility treatment, although the magnitude of reduction varied by definition of infertility. Absence of pregnancy within a year of being at risk may be informative about health.

KEYWORDS:

Birth size; fecundity; health; infertility; pregnancy

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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