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Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2016 Jul;8:136-40. doi: 10.1016/j.msard.2016.05.019. Epub 2016 May 31.

Longitudinal BMI trajectories in multiple sclerosis: Sex differences in association with disease severity.

Author information

1
Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Brookline, MA 02445, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: riley_bove@post.harvard.edu.
2
Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Brookline, MA 02445, USA. Electronic address: ajmusallam@gmail.com.
3
Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Brookline, MA 02445, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: zxia1@post.harvard.edu.
4
Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Brookline, MA 02445, USA; Partners Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: baruch.natalie352@gmail.com.
5
Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Brookline, MA 02445, USA; Department G.F. Ingrassia, Section of Neurosciences, University of Catania, Italy. Electronic address: silvia.messina@unict.it.
6
Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Brookline, MA 02445, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Massachusetts General Hospital Biostatistics Center, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: bchealy@partners.org.
7
Partners Multiple Sclerosis Center, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Brookline, MA 02445, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Partners Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: tchitnis@partners.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Adolescent obesity is a risk factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), but little is known about changes in body mass index (BMI) after MS onset.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the relationship between MS and longitudinal changes in BMI.

METHODS:

We analyzed prospectively collected BMIs in a cohort of patients with adult-onset MS and matched adult healthy controls (HC) gathered from the same hospital network central clinical data registry.

RESULTS:

We made three main observations. First, at baseline MS patients had a significantly higher BMI than HC (age- and sex- adjusted mean difference=0.57; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.99; p=0.008). Second, a significant age by MS status interaction was observed (p<0.0001), such that in MS, BMIs did not increase significantly higher in older individuals, whereas BMIs in HCs were higher with increasing age. Third, we observed sex-specific associations with disease severity: higher BMI was associated with higher cross-sectional EDSS in women, but with lower EDSS in men (p=0.003, N=758). There were no longitudinal associations between BMI and EDSS in either sex or in the entire cohort (p=0.65, N=772).

CONCLUSION:

After MS onset, patients may not experience age-expected increases in BMI. BMI may have sex-specific associations with MS disability scores. More refined measures of body composition are warranted in future studies to distinguish adiposity from muscle mass.

KEYWORDS:

Body mass index; Multiple sclerosis; Obesity; Sex differences

PMID:
27456889
DOI:
10.1016/j.msard.2016.05.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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