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J Athl Train. 2016 Jan;51(1):57-64. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-51.1.10. Epub 2015 Dec 23.

Epidemiology of National Collegiate Athletic Association Men's and Women's Cross-Country Injuries, 2009-2010 Through 2013-2014.

Author information

1
Datalys Center for Sports Injury Research and Prevention, Inc, Indianapolis, IN;
2
Sports Science Institute, National Collegiate Athletic Association, Indianapolis, IN;
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle;
4
St Vincent Sports Performance, Indianapolis, IN.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Recent injury-surveillance data for collegiate-level cross-country athletes are limited.

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the epidemiology of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) men's and women's cross-country injuries during the 2009-2010 through 2013-2014 academic years.

DESIGN:

Descriptive epidemiology study.

SETTING:

Aggregate injury and exposure data collected from 25 men's and 22 women's cross-country programs, providing 47 and 43 seasons of data, respectively.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:

Collegiate student-athletes participating in men's and women's cross-country during the 2009-2010 through 2013-2014 academic years.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Injury rates; injury rate ratios (RRs); injury proportions by body site, diagnosis, and apparatus; and injury proportion ratios were reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS:

The Injury Surveillance Program captured 216 injuries from men's cross-country and 260 injuries from women's cross-country, leading to injury rates of 4.66/1000 athlete-exposures (AEs) for men (95% CI = 4.04, 5.28) and 5.85/1000 AEs for women (95% CI = 5.14, 6.56). The injury rate in women's cross-country was 1.25 times that of men's cross-country (95% CI = 1.05, 1.50). Most injuries affected the lower extremity (men = 90.3%, women = 81.9%). The hip/groin-injury rate in women (0.65/1000 AEs) was higher than that in men (0.15/1000 AEs; RR = 4.32; 95% CI = 1.89, 9.85). The ankle-injury rate in men (0.60/1000 AEs) was higher than that in women (0.29/1000 AEs; RR = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.07, 3.99). Common diagnoses were strains (men = 19.9%, women = 20.4%) and inflammation (men = 18.1%, women = 23.8%). The majority of injuries were classified as overuse (men = 57.6%, women = 53.3%).

CONCLUSIONS:

Consistent with prior research, injury distributions varied between male and female athletes, and the injury rate among females was higher. Understanding the epidemiology of these cross-country injuries may be important for developing appropriate preventive interventions.

KEYWORDS:

collegiate sports; distance running; injury prevention

PMID:
26701643
PMCID:
PMC4851130
DOI:
10.4085/1062-6050-51.1.10
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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