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J Athl Train. 2015 Aug;50(8):870-8. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-50.7.02. Epub 2015 Jul 21.

Epidemiology of National Collegiate Athletic Association Women's Gymnastics Injuries, 2009-2010 Through 2013-2014.

Author information

1
Datalys Center for Sports Injury Research and Prevention, Inc, Indianapolis, IN.
2
Maryland Athletics, University of Maryland, College Park.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Recent injury-surveillance data for collegiate-level women's gymnastics are limited. In addition, researchers have not captured non-time-loss injuries (ie, injuries resulting in restriction of participation <1 day).

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the epidemiology of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) women's gymnastics injuries during the 2009-2010 through 2013-2014 academic years.

DESIGN:

Descriptive epidemiology study.

SETTING:

Aggregate injury and exposure data collected from 11 women's gymnastics programs providing 28 seasons of data.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:

Collegiate student-athletes participating in women's gymnastics during the 2009-2010 through 2013-2014 academic years.

INTERVENTION(S):

Women's gymnastics data from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (ISP) during the 2009-2010 through 2013-2014 academic years were analyzed.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Injury rates; injury rate ratios; injury proportions by body site, diagnosis, and apparatus; and injury proportion ratios were reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS:

The ISP captured 418 women's gymnastics injuries, a rate of 9.22/1000 athlete-exposures (AEs; 95% CI = 8.33, 10.10). The competition injury rate (14.49/1000 AEs) was 1.67 times the practice injury rate (8.69/1000 AEs; 95% CI = 1.27, 2.19). When considering time-loss injuries only, the injury rate during this study period (3.62/1000 AEs) was lower than rates reported in earlier NCAA ISP surveillance data. Commonly injured body sites were the ankle (17.9%, n = 75), lower leg/Achilles tendon (13.6%, n = 57), trunk (13.4%, n = 56), and foot (12.4%, n = 52). Common diagnoses were ligament sprain (20.3%, n = 85) and muscle/tendon strain (18.7%, n = 78). Overall, 12.4% (n = 52) of injuries resulted in time loss of more than 3 weeks. Of the 291 injuries reported while a student-athlete used an apparatus (69.6%), most occurred during the floor exercise (41.9%, n = 122) and on the uneven bars (28.2%, n = 82).

CONCLUSIONS:

We observed a lower time-loss injury rate for women's gymnastics than shown in earlier NCAA ISP surveillance data. Safety initiatives in women's gymnastics, such as "sting mats," padded equipment, and a redesigned vault table, may have contributed to minimizing the frequency and severity of injury.

KEYWORDS:

incidence; injury surveillance; sports

PMID:
26196702
PMCID:
PMC4629945
DOI:
10.4085/1062-6050-50.7.02
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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