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Brain Lang. 2018 Nov;186:32-43. doi: 10.1016/j.bandl.2018.08.001. Epub 2018 Sep 11.

Cortical regions supporting reading comprehension skill for single words and discourse.

Author information

1
Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, United States; Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT, United States; CT Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Storrs, CT, United States.
2
Department of Linguistics and Cognitive Science, University of Delaware, United States; Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT, United States.
3
Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT, United States; CT Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Storrs, CT, United States.
4
Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT, United States.
5
Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT, United States; Department of Linguistics, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States.
6
Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT, United States; Departments of Psychology and Linguistics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
7
Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, United States; Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT, United States; Yale Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, United States; CT Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Storrs, CT, United States. Electronic address: nicole.landi@uconn.edu.

Abstract

A substantial amount of variation in reading comprehension skill is explained by listening comprehension skill, suggesting tight links between printed and spoken discourse processing. In addition, both word level (e.g., vocabulary) and discourse-level sub-skills (e.g., inference-making) support overall comprehension. However, while these contributions to variation in comprehension skill have been well-studied behaviorally, the underlying neurobiological basis of these relationships is less well understood. In order to examine the neural bases of individual differences in reading comprehension as a function of input modality and processing level, we examined functional neural activation to both spoken and printed single words and passages in adolescents with a range of comprehension skill. Data driven Partial Least Squares Correlation (PLSC) analyses revealed that comprehension skill was positively related to activation in a number of regions associated with discourse comprehension and negatively related to activation in regions associated with executive function and memory across processing levels and input modalities.

KEYWORDS:

Modality; Naturalistic design; Partial Least Squares Correlation (PLSC); Processing level; Reading comprehension; fMRI

PMID:
30212746
PMCID:
PMC6447036
DOI:
10.1016/j.bandl.2018.08.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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