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Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2016 Sep 5;113(35-36):583-9. doi: 10.3238/arztebl.2016.0583.

Fecal Microbiota Transplant in Patients With Recurrent Clostridium Difficile Infection.

Author information

1
Center for Infectious Diseases and Infection Control, Jena University Hospital
2
Jena, Department of Internal Medicine IV (Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases), Jena University Hospital, Jena
3
Department I of Internal Medicine and Center for Integrated Oncology CIO Köln/Bonn, University Hospital of Cologne; German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), Partner Site Bonn-Cologne

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The clinical effectiveness of fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infections (rCDI) has been demonstrated in randomized controlled trials. To assess the current status of FMT in Germany with respect to active centers, local standards, clinical effectiveness and safety, the MicroTrans Registry (NCT02681068) was established.

METHODS:

In a long-term retrospective multicenter observational study by the German Clinical Microbiome Study Group (GCMSG), primary and secondary cure on day 30 and 90, as well as occurrence of treatment-related adverse events were assessed. In addition to patient demographic data, we provide an overview of the FMT procedures and techniques used at different centers.

RESULTS:

Overall, 133 eligible patients from 33 centers were included, of which 64.7% were female (n = 86). The mean age was 75 years (interquartile range: 59.5-81.5). Administration via the duodenal route (n = 59; 44.4%) was the most frequently applied option, followed by colonic (n = 55; 41.1%), capsule (n = 13; 9.8%), and gastric administration (n = 4; 3.0%). Primary cure on day 30 and 90 was achieved in 84.2% (n = 101/120) and 78.3% (n = 72/92) of patients, respectively. Including re-treatment, secondary response was achieved in 87.5% (d 30; n = 105/120) and 85.9% (d 90; n = 79/92), respectively. Treatment- elated adverse events were documented in 16 patients (12.0%).

CONCLUSION:

FMT is a safe and effective treatment option for rCDI. However, FMT is currently available only in few centers in Germany, and treatment options vary from one center to another.

PMID:
27658471
PMCID:
PMC5963490
DOI:
10.3238/arztebl.2016.0583
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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