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Am J Prev Med. 2018 Feb;54(2):294-298. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.09.013. Epub 2017 Dec 13.

Environmental Supports for Physical Activity, National Health Interview Survey-2015.

Author information

1
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: xdh5@cdc.gov.
2
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
3
School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona.
4
Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
Prevention Research Center in St. Louis, Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri; Division of Public Health Sciences and Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri.
6
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The Guide to Community Preventive Services recommends combined built environment approaches to increase physical activity, including new or enhanced transportation infrastructure (e.g., sidewalks) and land use and environmental design interventions (e.g., close proximity of local destinations). The aim of this brief report is to provide nationally representative estimates of two types of built environment supports for physical activity: near-home walkable infrastructure and destinations, from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey.

METHODS:

Adults (n=30,453) reported the near-home presence of walkable transportation infrastructure (roads, sidewalks, paths, or trails where you can walk; and whether most streets have sidewalks) and four walkable destination types (shops, stores, or markets; bus or transit stops; movies, libraries, or churches; and places that help you relax, clear your mind, and reduce stress). The prevalence of each, and the count of destination types, was calculated (in 2017) and stratified by demographic characteristics.

RESULTS:

Overall, 85.1% reported roads, sidewalks, paths, or trails on which to walk, and 62.6% reported sidewalks on most streets. Among destinations, 71.8% reported walkable places to relax; followed by shops (58.0%); transit stops (53.2%); and movies, libraries, or churches (47.5%). For most design elements, prevalence was similar among adults aged 18-24 and 25-34 years, but decreased with age >35 years. Adults in the South reported a lower prevalence of all elements compared with those in other Census regions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Many U.S. adults report walkable built environment elements near their home; future efforts might target areas with many older adult residents or those living in the South.

PMID:
29246673
PMCID:
PMC5866529
[Available on 2019-02-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2017.09.013

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