Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS Pathog. 2017 Oct 26;13(10):e1006692. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1006692. eCollection 2017 Oct.

Pegivirus avoids immune recognition but does not attenuate acute-phase disease in a macaque model of HIV infection.

Author information

1
Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America.
2
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America.
3
Roche Sequencing Solutions, Madison, Wisconsin, United States of America.

Abstract

Human pegivirus (HPgV) protects HIV+ people from HIV-associated disease, but the mechanism of this protective effect remains poorly understood. We sequentially infected cynomolgus macaques with simian pegivirus (SPgV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) to model HIV+HPgV co-infection. SPgV had no effect on acute-phase SIV pathogenesis-as measured by SIV viral load, CD4+ T cell destruction, immune activation, or adaptive immune responses-suggesting that HPgV's protective effect is exerted primarily during the chronic phase of HIV infection. We also examined the immune response to SPgV in unprecedented detail, and found that this virus elicits virtually no activation of the immune system despite persistently high titers in the blood over long periods of time. Overall, this study expands our understanding of the pegiviruses-an understudied group of viruses with a high prevalence in the global human population-and suggests that the protective effect observed in HIV+HPgV co-infected people occurs primarily during the chronic phase of HIV infection.

PMID:
29073258
PMCID:
PMC5675458
DOI:
10.1371/journal.ppat.1006692
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center