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J Autism Dev Disord. 2016 Apr;46(4):1307-18. doi: 10.1007/s10803-015-2672-6.

Persistent Angiogenesis in the Autism Brain: An Immunocytochemical Study of Postmortem Cortex, Brainstem and Cerebellum.

Author information

1
Departments of Biology and Psychiatry, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York, NY, 10003, USA. eca1@nyu.edu.
2
Departments of Biology and Psychiatry, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York, NY, 10003, USA.
3
Division of Molecular Imaging and Neuropathology, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY, 10032, USA.
5
Departments of Psychology Program in Integrative Neuroscience, and Psychiatry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794, USA.

Abstract

In the current work, we conducted an immunocytochemical search for markers of ongoing neurogenesis (e.g. nestin) in auditory cortex from postmortem sections of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and age-matched control donors. We found nestin labeling in cells of the vascular system, indicating blood vessels plasticity. Evidence of angiogenesis was seen throughout superior temporal cortex (primary auditory cortex), fusiform cortex (face recognition center), pons/midbrain and cerebellum in postmortem brains from ASD patients but not control brains. We found significant increases in both nestin and CD34, which are markers of angiogenesis localized to pericyte cells and endothelial cells, respectively. This labeling profile is indicative of splitting (intussusceptive), rather than sprouting, angiogenesis indicating the blood vessels are in constant flux rather than continually expanding.

KEYWORDS:

CD34; Endothelial; Intussusceptive; Nestin; Pericytes; Superior temporal cortex

PMID:
26667147
PMCID:
PMC4836621
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-015-2672-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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