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Otol Neurotol. 2016 Feb;37(2):e75-81. doi: 10.1097/MAO.0000000000000910.

Sentence Recognition in Quiet and Noise by Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users: Relationships to Spoken Language.

Author information

1
*USC Tina and Rick Caruso Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California †USC Caruso Family Center for Childhood Communication, Los Angeles, California ‡Johns Hopkins University, Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated associations between sentence recognition and spoken language for children with cochlear implants (CI) enrolled in the Childhood Development after Cochlear Implantation (CDaCI) study.

STUDY DESIGN:

In a prospective longitudinal study, sentence recognition percent-correct scores and language standard scores were correlated at 48-, 60-, and 72-months post-CI activation.

SETTING:

Six tertiary CI centers in the United States.

PATIENTS:

Children with CIs participating in the CDaCI study.

INTERVENTION (S):

Cochlear implantation.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE (S):

Sentence recognition was assessed using the Hearing In Noise Test for Children (HINT-C) in quiet and at +10, +5, and 0 dB signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). Spoken language was assessed using the Clinical Assessment of Spoken Language (CASL) core composite and the antonyms, paragraph comprehension (syntax comprehension), syntax construction (expression), and pragmatic judgment tests.

RESULTS:

Positive linear relationships were found between CASL scores and HINT-C sentence scores when the sentences were delivered in quiet and at +10 and +5 dB S/N, but not at 0 dB S/N. At 48 months post-CI, sentence scores at +10 and +5 dB S/N were most strongly associated with CASL antonyms. At 60 and 72 months, sentence recognition in noise was most strongly associated with paragraph comprehension and syntax construction.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children with CIs learn spoken language in a variety of acoustic environments. Despite the observed inconsistent performance in different listening situations and noise-challenged environments, many children with CIs are able to build lexicons and learn the rules of grammar that enable recognition of sentences.

PMID:
26756159
PMCID:
PMC4712714
DOI:
10.1097/MAO.0000000000000910
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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