Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Tissue Eng Part C Methods. 2015 Jun;21(6):541-7. doi: 10.1089/ten.TEC.2014.0450. Epub 2014 Dec 11.

Formation of spatially and geometrically controlled three-dimensional tissues in soft gels by sacrificial micromolding.

Author information

1
1UC Berkeley-UCSF Graduate Program in Bioengineering, Department of Bioengineering, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California.
2
6Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
3
2Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, California.
4
3TETRAD Graduate Program, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
5
4Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
6
5Chemistry and Chemical Biology Graduate Program, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
7
7University of California San Francisco Center for Systems and Synthetic Biology, San Francisco, California.

Abstract

Patterned three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models aim to more accurately represent the in vivo architecture of a tissue for the purposes of testing drugs, studying multicellular biology, or engineering functional tissues. However, patterning 3D multicellular structures within very soft hydrogels (<500 Pa) that mimic the physicochemical environment of many tissues remains a challenge for existing methods. To overcome this challenge, we use a Sacrificial Micromolding technique to temporarily form spatially and geometrically defined 3D cell aggregates in degradable scaffolds before transferring and culturing them in a reconstituted extracellular matrix. Herein, we demonstrate that Sacrificial Micromolding (1) promotes cyst formation and proper polarization of established epithelial cell lines, (2) allows reconstitution of heterotypic cell-cell interactions in multicomponent epithelia, and (3) can be used to control the lumenization-state of epithelial cysts as a function of tissue size. In addition, we discuss the potential of Sacrificial Micromolding as a cell-patterning tool for future studies.

PMID:
25351430
PMCID:
PMC4442595
DOI:
10.1089/ten.TEC.2014.0450
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center