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Environ Res. 2014 Aug;133:12-9. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2014.04.040. Epub 2014 Jun 3.

Dietary predictors of urinary environmental biomarkers in young girls, BCERP, 2004-7.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1 Gustave L. Levy Place Box 1057, New York, NY 10029, USA. Electronic address: Nancy.Mervish@mssm.edu.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1 Gustave L. Levy Place Box 1057, New York, NY 10029, USA.
3
Department of Environmental Health, Kettering Building, Room 208, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3223 Eden Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0056, USA.
4
Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control, California Department of Public Health, 850 Marina Bay Pkwy, Bldg P, Richmond CA 94804, USA.
5
Division of Adolescent Medicine, Cincinnati Children׳s Hospital Medical Center, 3333, Burnet Avenue (ML-4000), Cincinnati OH 45229-3029, USA.
6
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente, 2000 Broadway, Oakland, CA 94612, USA.
7
National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Exposures of children to phthalates, parabens, and bisphenol-A (BPA) are of concern because of their hormonal potential. These agents are found in a wide range of foods and packaging. We investigated whether intake of certain foods predict exposures to these chemicals in young girls.

METHODS:

Among 1101 girls (6-8 years at enrollment) from the Breast Cancer and Environment Research Program (BCERP) study, we measured urinary exposure biomarkers for phthalates, parabens, and BPA and assessed dietary intake using 24-h recall 2-4 times. We examined the average daily servings of major and minor food groups categorized as 0 to <0.5, 0.5 to <1 and ≥ 1 servings per day. Items included dairy, eggs, fats, fish, fruit, single grains, meat, non-poultry meats, pasta, poultry and vegetables. Covariate-adjusted least squares geometric means and 95% confidence intervals of creatinine-corrected phthalate and phenol metabolite concentrations in urine were calculated in relation to food intake.

RESULTS:

Grains, flour and dry mixes and total fish consumption were positively associated with BPA and the sum of four di-2-ethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) urinary metabolite concentrations. Non-fresh vegetables and poultry were both positively associated with BPA and paraben urinary concentrations. Fats, oils and poultry consumption were positively associated with BPA. Whole-fat dairy consumption was associated with ΣDEHP.

CONCLUSIONS:

Some foods may contribute to child exposures to certain chemicals, and this may constitute modifiable means to reduce these environmental exposures.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarkers; Bisphenol A; Endocrine disruptors; Parabens; Phthalates

PMID:
24906063
PMCID:
PMC4119560
DOI:
10.1016/j.envres.2014.04.040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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