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Neuroimage. 2012 Feb 15;59(4):3563-70. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.11.046. Epub 2011 Nov 28.

Individualized localization and cortical surface-based registration of intracranial electrodes.

Author information

1
Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA. adykstra@mit.edu

Abstract

In addition to its widespread clinical use, the intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) is increasingly being employed as a tool to map the neural correlates of normal cognitive function as well as for developing neuroprosthetics. Despite recent advances, and unlike other established brain-mapping modalities (e.g. functional MRI, magneto- and electroencephalography), registering the iEEG with respect to neuroanatomy in individuals-and coregistering functional results across subjects-remains a significant challenge. Here we describe a method which coregisters high-resolution preoperative MRI with postoperative computerized tomography (CT) for the purpose of individualized functional mapping of both normal and pathological (e.g., interictal discharges and seizures) brain activity. Our method accurately (within 3mm, on average) localizes electrodes with respect to an individual's neuroanatomy. Furthermore, we outline a principled procedure for either volumetric or surface-based group analyses. We demonstrate our method in five patients with medically-intractable epilepsy undergoing invasive monitoring of the seizure focus prior to its surgical removal. The straight-forward application of this procedure to all types of intracranial electrodes, robustness to deformations in both skull and brain, and the ability to compare electrode locations across groups of patients makes this procedure an important tool for basic scientists as well as clinicians.

PMID:
22155045
PMCID:
PMC3288767
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.11.046
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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