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Am J Public Health. 2010 Apr 1;100 Suppl 1:S269-76. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2009.176180. Epub 2010 Feb 10.

Racial differences in the association between self-rated health status and objective clinical measures among participants in the BARI 2D trial.

Author information

1
Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. sbthomas@pitt.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We explored whether and how race shapes perceived health status in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease.

METHODS:

We analyzed self-rated health (fair or poor versus good, very good, or excellent) and associated clinical risk factors among 866 White and 333 Black participants in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes trial.

RESULTS:

Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument scores, regular exercise, and employment were associated with higher self-rated health (P < .05). Blacks were more likely than were Whites to rate their health as fair or poor (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.38, 2.57; P < .001). Among Whites but not Blacks, a clinical history of myocardial infarction (OR = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.12, 2.31; P < .001) and insulin use (OR = 1.62; 95% CI = 1.10, 2.38; P = .01) was associated with a fair or poor rating. A post-high school education was related to poorer self-rated health among Blacks (OR = 1.86; 95% CI = 1.07, 3.24; P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Symptomatic clinical factors played a proportionally larger role in self-assessment of health among Whites with diabetes and coronary artery disease than among Blacks with the same conditions.

PMID:
20147671
PMCID:
PMC2837445
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2009.176180
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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