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Prev Med. 2012 May;54 Suppl:S42-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.11.013. Epub 2011 Dec 8.

Oxidative stress-induced biomarkers for stem cell-based chemical screening.

Author information

1
Adult Stem Cell Research Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Stem cells have been considered for their potential in pharmaceutical research, as well as for stem cell-based therapy for many diseases. Despite the potential for their use, the challenge remains to examine the safety and efficacy of stem cells for their use in therapies. Recently, oxidative stress has been strongly implicated in the functional regulation of cell behavior of stem cells. Therefore, development of rapid and sensitive biomarkers, related to oxidative stress is of growing importance in stem cell-based therapies for treating various diseases. Since stem cells have been implicated as targets for carcinogenesis and might be the origin of "cancer stem cells", understanding of how oxidative stress-induced signaling, known to be involved in the carcinogenic process could lead to potential screening of cancer chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents. An evaluation of antioxidant states reducing equivalents like GSH and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation, can be effective markers in stem cell-based therapies. In addition, oxidative adducts, such as 4-hydroxynonenal, can be reliable markers to detect cellular changes during self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. This review highlights the biomarker development to monitor oxidative stress response for stem cell-based chemical screening.

PMID:
22197760
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.11.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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