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Sleep Breath. 2015 Mar;19(1):281-9. doi: 10.1007/s11325-014-1011-z. Epub 2014 May 26.

Oropharyngeal exercises to reduce symptoms of OSA after AT.

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  • 1Neuroscience, Mental Health and Sense Organs Department, Pediatric Sleep Disease Centre, S. Andrea Hospital, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Via Grottarossa 1035/1039, 00189, Rome, Italy, mariapia.villa@uniroma1.it.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study evaluated the efficacy of oropharyngeal exercises in children with symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) after adenotonsillectomy.

METHODS:

Polysomnographic recordings were performed before adenotonsillectomy and 6 months after surgery. Patients with residual OSA (apnea-Hypopnea Index, AHI > 1 and persistence of respiratory symptoms) after adenotonsillectomy were randomized either to a group treated with oropharyngeal exercises (group 1) or to a control group (group 2). A morphofunctional evaluation with Glatzel and Rosenthal tests was performed before and after 2 months of exercises. All the subjects were re-evaluated after exercise through polysomnography and clinical evaluation. The improvement in OSA was defined by ΔAHI: (AHI at T1 - AHI at T2)/AHI at T1 × 100.

RESULTS:

Group 1 was composed of 14 subjects (mean age, 6.01 ± 1.55) while group 2 was composed of 13 subjects (mean age, 5.76 ± 0.82). The AHI was 16.79 ± 9.34 before adenotonsillectomy and 4.72 ± 3.04 after surgery (p < 0.001). The ΔAHI was significantly higher in group 1 (58.01 %; range from 40.51 to 75.51 %) than in group 2 (6.96 %; range from -23.04 to 36.96 %). Morphofunctional evaluation demonstrated a reduction in oral breathing (p = 0.002), positive Glatzel test (p < 0.05), positive Rosenthal test (p < 0.05), and increased labial seal (p < 0.001), and lip tone (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Oropharyngeal exercises may be considered as complementary therapy to adenotonsillectomy to effectively treat pediatric OSA.

PMID:
24859614
DOI:
10.1007/s11325-014-1011-z
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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