Format

Send to

Choose Destination
  • Showing results for noordam r associations of outdoor temperature, bright sunlight. Your search for Noordham R Associations of outdoor temperature, bright sunlight retrieved no results.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2019 Feb 12. doi: 10.1210/jc.2018-02532. [Epub ahead of print]

Associations of outdoor temperature, bright sunlight and cardiometabolic traits in two European population-based cohorts.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.
2
Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Division of Neurophysiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.
3
Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
4
NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, OUH Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK.
5
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.
6
Department of Human Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.
7
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Abstract

Context:

Seasonal variation in cold and light exposure may influence metabolic health.

Objective:

We assessed the associations of bright sunlight and outdoor temperature with measures of glucose and lipid metabolism in two populations of middle-aged European subjects.

Design:

Cross-sectional study.

Setting:

Two population-based European cohorts.

Patients or Other Participants:

Middle-aged non-diabetic subjects from the Oxford Biobank (OBB; N=4,327; mean age 41.4 years) and the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity Study (NEO; N=5,899; mean age 55.6 years).

Intervention(s):

Data on outdoor bright sunlight and temperature collected from local weather stations.

Main Outcome Measure(s):

Insulin resistance and fasting lipid levels.

Statistical analyses:

Multivariable regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, percentage body fat, season, and either outdoor temperature or bright sunlight.

Results:

In the OBB cohort, increased bright sunlight exposure was associated with lower fasting insulin (-1.27% [95% confidence interval: -2.09, -0.47] per extra hour of bright sunlight), lower homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (-1.36% [-2.23, -0.50]), lower homeostatic model assessment for beta cell function (-0.80% [-1.31, -0.30]), and lower triglyceride (-1.28% [-2.07, -0.50]) levels. In the NEO cohort generally unidirectional but weaker associations were observed. No associations between outdoor temperature and measures of glucose or lipid metabolism were detected following adjustment for bright sunlight.

Conclusions:

Bright sunlight, but not outdoor temperature, might be associated with increased insulin sensitivity and lower triglyceride levels.

PMID:
30759251
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2018-02532

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center