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J Neurosci. 2018 Oct 31;38(44):9459-9467. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1678-18.2018.

New observations in neuroscience using superresolution microscopy.

Author information

1
Department of Neurochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medicine, Niigata 951-8510, Japan, tarokaja@med.niigata-u.ac.jp.
2
Department of Neurochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medicine, Niigata 951-8510, Japan.
3
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, Maryland 20892.
4
Department of Nanophysics, Fondazione Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Genova 16163, Italy.
5
Momentum Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Molecular and Developmental Neurobiology, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1083, Hungary.
6
Nikon Center of Excellence for Neuronal Imaging, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary.
7
Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.
8
Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, China.
9
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China, and.
10
Department of Biological Engineering and Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Media Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139.

Abstract

Superresolution microscopy (SM) techniques are among the revolutionary methods for molecular and cellular observations in the 21st century. SM techniques overcome optical limitations, and several new observations using SM lead us to expect these techniques to have a large impact on neuroscience in the near future. Several types of SM have been developed, including structured illumination microscopy (SIM), stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED), and photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM)/stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), each with special features. In this Minisymposium, experts in these different types of SM discuss the new structural and functional information about specific important molecules in neuroscience that has been gained with SM. Using these techniques, we have revealed novel mechanisms of endocytosis in nerve growth, fusion pore dynamics, and described quantitative new properties of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Additional powerful techniques, including single molecule-guided Bayesian localization SM (SIMBA) and expansion microscopy (ExM), alone or combined with super-resolution observation, are also introduced in this session.

PMID:
30381437
PMCID:
PMC6209844
[Available on 2019-05-01]
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1678-18.2018

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