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Prev Med. 2016 Feb;83:16-21. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.11.024. Epub 2015 Dec 5.

Multiple tobacco product use among young adult bar patrons in New Mexico.

Author information

1
Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
2
Tobacco Use Prevention & Control Program, New Mexico Department of Health, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
3
Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
4
Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic address: pamela.ling@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Use of non-cigarette tobacco products is common, and e-cigarette use is increasing among young adults. We aimed to identify use of other tobacco products among young adult bar patrons in the context of a bar-based intervention to decrease cigarette smoking.

METHODS:

2291 cross-sectional surveys were collected from young adults in bars in Albuquerque, New Mexico using time-location sampling between 2011 and 2013 (N=1142 in 2011, N=1149 in 2012-2013), 2 and 3years into an intervention to reduce cigarette use, and analyzed in 2014-2015. Participants reported current (i.e. past 30-day) use of cigarettes, snus, dip, cigarillos, hookah, and e-cigarettes, demographics, and tobacco-related attitudes. Multiple imputation was used to account for planned missing data. Logistic regression determined correlates of multiple tobacco product use.

RESULTS:

Cigarette smoking in the population decreased during the intervention from 43% to 37%. Over 60% of current cigarette smokers reported poly-use, most frequently with e-cigarettes (46%) and hookah (44%), followed by cigarillos (24%), dip (15%), and snus (14%) in 2012-2013. Among cigarette smokers, current e-cigarette use increased, while use of other products decreased during the intervention. Odds of poly-use (versus smoking cigarettes only) were greater among males and those reporting past 30-day binge drinking, and lower in those who strongly believed secondhand smoke exposure is harmful.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among young adult bar patrons in Albuquerque, New Mexico, most cigarette smokers reported currently using at least one other tobacco product. Public health interventions should address use of all tobacco products, use of which may rise despite decreased cigarette use.

KEYWORDS:

Electronic cigarettes; Tobacco products; Tobacco use; Young adult

PMID:
26666395
PMCID:
PMC5433518
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.11.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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