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Helicobacter. 2015 Aug;20(4):316-20. doi: 10.1111/hel.12204. Epub 2015 Jan 13.

Molecular Detection of Helicobacter pylori and its Antimicrobial Resistance in Brazzaville, Congo.

Author information

1
Microbiology and Haematology Department, Health Sciences Faculty, Brazzaville, Congo.
2
Medicine Department, Health Sciences Faculty, Brazzaville, Congo.
3
Molecular and Cellular Biology Department, Technical and Sciences Faculty, Brazzaville, Congo.
4
Chemistry plant and life unit, Technical and Sciences Faculty, Brazzaville, Congo.
5
Biochemistry Department, Health Sciences Faculty, Brazzaville, Congo.
6
University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
7
INSERM U853, Bordeaux, France.
8
French National Reference Center for Campylobacters and Helicobacters, University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.

Abstract

BACK GROUND:

Helicobacter pylori infection is involved in several gastroduodenal diseases which can be cured by antimicrobial treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection and its bacterial resistance to clarithromycin, fluoroquinolones, and tetracycline in Brazzaville, Congo, by using molecular methods.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

A cross- sectional study was carried out between September 2013 and April 2014. Biopsy specimens were obtained from patients scheduled for an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and were sent to the French National Reference Center for Campylobacters and Helicobacters where they were tested by molecular methods for detection of H. pylori and clarithromycin resistance by real-time PCR using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-melting curve analysis (FRET-MCA) protocol, for detection of tetracycline resistance by real-time PCR on 16S rRNA genes (rrnA and rrnB), for detection of point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDR) of H. pylori gyrA gene, associated with resistance to quinolones, by PCR and sequencing.

RESULTS:

This study showed a high H. pylori prevalence (89%), low rates of clarithromycin and tetracycline resistance (1.7% and 2.5%, respectively), and a high rate of quinolone resistance (50%).

CONCLUSION:

Therefore, the use of standard clarithromycin-based triple therapy is still possible as an empiric first-line treatment as well as prescription of bismuth-based quadruple therapy, which includes tetracycline, but not a levofloxacin-based triple therapy because of the high rate of resistance to fluoroquinolones.

KEYWORDS:

Macrolides; fluoroquinolones; gastric biopsies; real-time PCR; tetracycline

PMID:
25585658
DOI:
10.1111/hel.12204
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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