Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Neurophysiol. 2016 Mar;115(3):1146-56. doi: 10.1152/jn.00261.2015. Epub 2015 Dec 16.

Modulation of impulsivity and reward sensitivity in intertemporal choice by striatal and midbrain dopamine synthesis in healthy adults.

Author information

  • 1Neurobiology Curriculum, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina;
  • 2Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California;
  • 3Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California;
  • 4Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, California; Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; and.
  • 5Neurobiology Curriculum, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina; Department of Psychology & Neuroscience, Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies, and Biomedical Research Imaging Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina cab@unc.edu.

Abstract

Converging evidence links individual differences in mesolimbic and mesocortical dopamine (DA) to variation in the tendency to choose immediate rewards ("Now") over larger, delayed rewards ("Later"), or "Now bias." However, to date, no study of healthy young adults has evaluated the relationship between Now bias and DA with positron emission tomography (PET). Sixteen healthy adults (ages 24-34 yr; 50% women) completed a delay-discounting task that quantified aspects of intertemporal reward choice, including Now bias and reward magnitude sensitivity. Participants also underwent PET scanning with 6-[(18)F]fluoro-l-m-tyrosine (FMT), a radiotracer that measures DA synthesis capacity. Lower putamen FMT signal predicted elevated Now bias, a more rapidly declining discount rate with increasing delay time, and reduced willingness to accept low-interest-rate delayed rewards. In contrast, lower FMT signal in the midbrain predicted greater sensitivity to increasing magnitude of the Later reward. These data demonstrate that intertemporal reward choice in healthy humans varies with region-specific measures of DA processing, with regionally distinct associations with sensitivity to delay and to reward magnitude.

KEYWORDS:

delay discounting; immediate reward bias; impulsive choice; putamen; ventral tegmental area

PMID:
26683066
PMCID:
PMC4808128
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1152/jn.00261.2015
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center