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Eur Heart J. 2014 Dec 7;35(46):3287-95. doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehu389. Epub 2014 Sep 21.

Midlife blood pressure change and left ventricular mass and remodelling in older age in the 1946 British Birth Cohort Study.

Author information

1
International Centre for Circulatory Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, 59-61 North Wharf Road, London W2 1LA, UK Medical Research Council Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing, University College London, London, UK a.ghosh@imperial.ac.uk.
2
Medical Research Council Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing, University College London, London, UK.
3
International Centre for Circulatory Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, 59-61 North Wharf Road, London W2 1LA, UK.
4
Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London, London, UK.
5
The Heart Hospital, University College London, London, UK.

Abstract

AIMS:

Antecedent blood pressure (BP) may contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of current BP. Blood pressure is associated with left ventricular mass index (LVMI) which independently predicts CVD. We investigated the relationship between midlife BP from age 36 to 64 and LVMI at 60-64 years.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

A total of 1653 participants in the British 1946 Birth Cohort underwent BP measurement and echocardiography aged 60-64. Blood pressure had previously been measured at 36, 43, and 53 years. We investigated associations between BP at each age and rate of change in systolic blood pressure (SBP) between 36-43, 43-53, and 53-60/64 years on LVMI at 60-64 years. Blood pressure from 36 years was positively associated with LVMI. Association with SBP at 53 years was independent of SBP at 60-64 years and other potential confounders (fully adjusted β at 53 years = 0.19 g/m(2); 95% CI: 0.11, 0.27; P < 0.001). Faster rates of increase in SBP from 43 to 53 years and 53 to 60/64 years were associated with increased LVMI. Similar relationships were seen for diastolic, pulse, and mean pressure. Rate of increase in SBP between 43-53 years was associated with largest change in LVMI (β at 43-53 years = 3.12 g/m(2); 95% CI: 1.53, 4.72; P < 0.001). People on antihypertensive medication (43 years onwards) had greater LVMI even after adjustment for current BP (β at 43 years = 12.36 g/m(2); 95% CI: 3.19, 21.53; P = 0.008).

CONCLUSION:

Higher BP in midlife and rapid rise of SBP in 5th decade is associated with higher LVMI in later life, independent of current BP. People with treated hypertension have higher LVMI than untreated individuals, even accounting for their higher BP. Our findings emphasize importance of midlife BP as risk factor for future CVD.

KEYWORDS:

Blood pressure; Echocardiography; Left ventricular hypertrophy; Left ventricular mass

PMID:
25246483
PMCID:
PMC4258225
DOI:
10.1093/eurheartj/ehu389
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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