Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

See comment in PubMed Commons below
Lancet Infect Dis. 2013 Oct;13(10):859-66. doi: 10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70164-6. Epub 2013 Aug 9.

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus neutralising serum antibodies in dromedary camels: a comparative serological study.

Author information

1
Centre for Infectious Disease Research, Diagnostics and Screening, Division Virology, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands. Electronic address: Chantal.Reusken@RIVM.nl.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A new betacoronavirus-Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV)-has been identified in patients with severe acute respiratory infection. Although related viruses infect bats, molecular clock analyses have been unable to identify direct ancestors of MERS-CoV. Anecdotal exposure histories suggest that patients had been in contact with dromedary camels or goats. We investigated possible animal reservoirs of MERS-CoV by assessing specific serum antibodies in livestock.

METHODS:

We took sera from animals in the Middle East (Oman) and from elsewhere (Spain, Netherlands, Chile). Cattle (n=80), sheep (n=40), goats (n=40), dromedary camels (n=155), and various other camelid species (n=34) were tested for specific serum IgG by protein microarray using the receptor-binding S1 subunits of spike proteins of MERS-CoV, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and human coronavirus OC43. Results were confirmed by virus neutralisation tests for MERS-CoV and bovine coronavirus.

FINDINGS:

50 of 50 (100%) sera from Omani camels and 15 of 105 (14%) from Spanish camels had protein-specific antibodies against MERS-CoV spike. Sera from European sheep, goats, cattle, and other camelids had no such antibodies. MERS-CoV neutralising antibody titres varied between 1/320 and 1/2560 for the Omani camel sera and between 1/20 and 1/320 for the Spanish camel sera. There was no evidence for cross-neutralisation by bovine coronavirus antibodies.

INTERPRETATION:

MERS-CoV or a related virus has infected camel populations. Both titres and seroprevalences in sera from different locations in Oman suggest widespread infection.

FUNDING:

European Union, European Centre For Disease Prevention and Control, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

PMID:
23933067
DOI:
10.1016/S1473-3099(13)70164-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center