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Brain Res. 2017 May 15;1663:194-204. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2017.03.007. Epub 2017 Mar 14.

EEG oscillatory power dissociates between distress- and depression-related psychopathology in subjective tinnitus.

Author information

1
Neuroplasticity and Learning in the Healthy Aging Brain (HAB LAB), Institute of Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland; University Research Priority Program 'Dynamics of Healthy Aging', University of Zurich, Switzerland; Center for Integrative Human Physiology, University of Zurich, Switzerland; Cognitive Psychology Unit (CPU), University of Klagenfurt, Austria. Electronic address: martin.meyer@uzh.ch.
2
Neuroplasticity and Learning in the Healthy Aging Brain (HAB LAB), Institute of Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland; University Research Priority Program 'Dynamics of Healthy Aging', University of Zurich, Switzerland; Institute for Computer Music and Sound Technology (ICST), University of Arts Zurich, Switzerland.
3
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland.
4
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland.

Abstract

Recent research has used source estimation approaches to identify spatially distinct neural configurations in individuals with chronic, subjective tinnitus (TI). The results of these studies are often heterogeneous, a fact which may be partly explained by an inherent heterogeneity in the TI population and partly by the applied EEG data analysis procedure and EEG hardware. Hence this study was performed to re-enact a formerly published study (Joos et al., 2012) to better understand the reason for differences and overlap between studies from different labs. We re-investigated the relationship between neural oscillations and behavioral measurements of affective states in TI, namely depression and tinnitus-related distress by recruiting 45 TI who underwent resting-state EEG. Comprehensive psychopathological (depression and tinnitus-related distress scores) and psychometric data (including other tinnitus characteristics) were gathered. A principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to unveil independent factors that predict distinct aspects of tinnitus-related pathology. Furthermore, we correlated EEG power changes in the standard frequency bands with the behavioral scores for both the whole-brain level and, as a post hoc approach, for selected regions of interest (ROI) based on sLORETA. Behavioral data revealed significant relationships between measurements of depression and tinnitus-related distress. Notably, no significant results were observed for the depressive scores and modulations of the EEG signal. However, akin to the former study we evidenced a significant relationship between a power increase in the β-bands and tinnitus-related distress. In conclusion, it has emerged that depression and tinnitus-related distress, even though they are assumed not to be completely independent, manifest in distinct neural configurations.

KEYWORDS:

Auditory cortex; Distress; EEG power analysis; Neural oscillations; Neuroplasticity; Tinnitus; sLORETA

PMID:
28315312
DOI:
10.1016/j.brainres.2017.03.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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