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J Glob Health. 2017 Dec;7(2):020412. doi: 10.7189/jogh.07.020412.

Methods used in adaptation of health-related guidelines: A systematic survey.

Author information

1
AUB GRADE Center, Clinical Research Institute, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon.
2
Faculty of Health Sciences, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon.
3
Faculty of Medicine and Medical Sciences - University of Balamand, Balamand Al Kurah, Lebanon.
4
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Canada.
5
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
6
State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY University at Buffalo), Buffalo, USA.
7
Inserm/Université Paris Descartes, Cochrane France, Hôpital Hôtel-Dieu, Paris, France.
8
Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
9
Faculty of Medicine, Univeristé Saint Joseph, Beirut, Lebanon.
10
Department of Medicine, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon.

Abstract

Background:

Adaptation refers to the systematic approach for considering the endorsement or modification of recommendations produced in one setting for application in another as an alternative to de novo development.

Objective:

To describe and assess the methods used for adapting health-related guidelines published in peer-reviewed journals, and to assess the quality of the resulting adapted guidelines.

Methods:

We searched Medline and Embase up to June 2015. We assessed the method of adaptation, and the quality of included guidelines.

Results:

Seventy-two papers were eligible. Most adapted guidelines and their source guidelines were published by professional societies (71% and 68% respectively), and in high-income countries (83% and 85% respectively). Of the 57 adapted guidelines that reported any detail about adaptation method, 34 (60%) did not use a published adaptation method. The number (and percentage) of adapted guidelines fulfilling each of the ADAPTE steps ranged between 2 (4%) and 57 (100%). The quality of adapted guidelines was highest for the "scope and purpose" domain and lowest for the "editorial independence" domain (respective mean percentages of the maximum possible scores were 93% and 43%). The mean score for "rigor of development" was 57%.

Conclusion:

Most adapted guidelines published in peer-reviewed journals do not report using a published adaptation method, and their adaptation quality was variable.

PMID:
29302318
PMCID:
PMC5740392
DOI:
10.7189/jogh.07.020412
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: The authors completed the Unified Competing Interest form at www.icmje.org/coi_disclosure.pdf (available upon request from the corresponding author), and report intellectual conflict of interest being members of the GRADE working group (AD, JJM, WW, NS, HJS, and EAA) and authors of studies reporting adaptation approaches (AD, JJM, WW, NS, HJS, and EAA).

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