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J Anxiety Disord. 2016 Aug;42:71-84. doi: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2016.06.007. Epub 2016 Jun 18.

Meta-analysis of technology-assisted interventions for social anxiety disorder.

Author information

  • 1Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 129 B, 1018 WS Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Amsterdam Brain and Cognition Center, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 129 B, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: i.l.kampmann@uva.nl.
  • 2Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 129 B, 1018 WS Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study, Meijboomlaan 1, 2242 PR Wassenaar, The Netherlands. Electronic address: p.m.g.emmelkamp@uva.nl.
  • 3Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 129 B, 1018 WS Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Amsterdam Brain and Cognition Center, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 129 B, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: n.morina@uva.nl.

Abstract

This meta-analysis investigated the efficacy of technology-assisted interventions for individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD). A systematic literature search in the databases Medline, PsychInfo, and Web of Science revealed 37 randomized controlled trials (2991 participants) that were grouped into internet delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT; 21 trials), virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET; 3 trials), and cognitive bias modification (CBM; 13 trials). Patients undergoing ICBT and VRET showed significantly less SAD symptoms at postassessment than passive control conditions (g=0.84 and 0.82, respectively). Compared to active control conditions, ICBT had a small advantage (g=0.38) and VRET showed comparable effects (p>0.05). CBM was not more effective than passive control conditions, except when delivered in the laboratory (g=0.35). While the efficacy of CBM was limited, substantial evidence for ICBT and preliminary evidence for VRET suggests that both can effectively reduce SAD symptoms indicating the potential of technology-assisted interventions for SAD.

KEYWORDS:

Cognitive bias modification; Internet cognitive behavior therapy; Social anxiety disorder; Virtual reality exposure

PMID:
27376634
DOI:
10.1016/j.janxdis.2016.06.007
[PubMed - in process]

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