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PLoS One. 2013 Sep 2;8(9):e73596. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0073596. eCollection 2013.

Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) promotes wound re-epithelialisation in frog and human skin.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University of Luebeck, Luebeck, Germany ; Department of Pathology, University of Luebeck, Luebeck, Germany.

Abstract

There remains a critical need for new therapeutics that promote wound healing in patients suffering from chronic skin wounds. This is, in part, due to a shortage of simple, physiologically and clinically relevant test systems for investigating candidate agents. The skin of amphibians possesses a remarkable regenerative capacity, which remains insufficiently explored for clinical purposes. Combining comparative biology with a translational medicine approach, we report the development and application of a simple ex vivo frog (Xenopus tropicalis) skin organ culture system that permits exploration of the effects of amphibian skin-derived agents on re-epithelialisation in both frog and human skin. Using this amphibian model, we identify thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) as a novel stimulant of epidermal regeneration. Moving to a complementary human ex vivo wounded skin assay, we demonstrate that the effects of TRH are conserved across the amphibian-mammalian divide: TRH stimulates wound closure and formation of neo-epidermis in organ-cultured human skin, accompanied by increased keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing-associated differentiation (cytokeratin 6 expression). Thus, TRH represents a novel, clinically relevant neuroendocrine wound repair promoter that deserves further exploration. These complementary frog and human skin ex vivo assays encourage a comparative biology approach in future wound healing research so as to facilitate the rapid identification and preclinical testing of novel, evolutionarily conserved, and clinically relevant wound healing promoters.

PMID:
24023889
PMCID:
PMC3759422
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0073596
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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