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J Pediatr Psychol. 2016 Sep;41(8):867-78. doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsv166. Epub 2016 Jan 7.

Making the Business Case for Coverage of Family-Based Behavioral Group Interventions for Pediatric Obesity.

Author information

1
Center for Children's Healthy Lifestyles & Nutrition, Kansas City, Missouri, Clinical Child Psychology Program, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, kborner@ku.edu.
2
Center for Healthcare Delivery Science, Nemours Children's Health System, Wilmington, Delaware.
3
Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas.
4
Center for Children's Healthy Lifestyles & Nutrition, Kansas City, Missouri, Department of Pediatrics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas.
5
Center for Children's Healthy Lifestyles & Nutrition, Kansas City, Missouri, Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Children's Mercy Hospitals & Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri.
6
Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics, University of Missouri - Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri, and Netsmart, Overland Park, Kansas.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pediatric obesity presents a significant burden. However, family-based behavioral group (FBBG) obesity interventions are largely uncovered by our health care system. The present study uses Return on Investment (ROI) and Internal Rate of Return (IRR) analyses to analyze the business side of FBBG interventions.

METHODS:

ROI and IRR were calculated to determine longitudinal cost-effectiveness of a FBBG intervention. Multiple simulations of cost savings are projected using three estimated trajectories of weight change and variations in assumptions.

RESULTS:

The baseline model of child savings gives an average IRR of 0.2% ± 0.08% and an average ROI of 20.8% ± 0.4%, which represents a break-even IRR and a positive ROI. More pessimistic simulations result in negative IRR values.

CONCLUSIONS:

Under certain assumptions, FBBGs offer a break-even proposition. Results are limited by lack of data regarding several assumptions, and future research should evaluate changes in cost savings following changes in child and adult weight.

KEYWORDS:

health policy; obesity; statistical applications; weight management

PMID:
26743573
DOI:
10.1093/jpepsy/jsv166
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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