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See 1 citation in Langenbecks Arch Surg 2008:

Langenbecks Arch Surg. 2008 Jan;393(1):59-66. Epub 2007 Jun 29.

Morphology, quality, and composition in mature human peritoneal adhesions.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany. mbinneboesel@ukaachen.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM:

Peritoneal adhesions are caused by intra-abdominal surgery and can lead to relevant complications. Adhesions are supposed to consist of avascular scar tissue. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether mature postsurgical adhesions even after years still reveal a dynamic remodeling process.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In a prospective analysis, we investigated tissue specimen of peritoneal adhesions in 40 patients after abdominal surgery. Expression of five parameters representing wound healing and remodeling were examined (MMP-2, Ki-67, apoptosis, collagen/protein ratio, and collagen type I/III ratio).

RESULTS:

Gender, age, and the number of previous operations had no impact on the parameters measured. Adhesion specimens were cell rich, containing mononuclear round cells, fibroblasts, adipose cells, and vascular endothelial cells. There was a positive expression of MMP-2 and apoptosis, whereas Ki-67 was marginal irrespective of adhesion maturity or quality. Adhesions classified as dense showed a significant increase in total collagen (118.2 +/- 4.9 microg/mg) and collagen type I/III ratios (3.9 +/- 0.2), whereas there were no significant differences regarding the adhesion maturity.

CONCLUSION:

The distinct composition of cellular components as well as of extracellular matrix proteins may reflect an interactive cross-talk between adhesion- and stroma-derived cells even in mature adhesions. Our findings support the hypothesis that the disabilities of appropriate repair of the peritoneal surface leading to persistent adhesions are a consequence of a permanent process of disturbed remodeling.

PMID:
17605037
DOI:
10.1007/s00423-007-0198-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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