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Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2016 Oct 1;311(4):G648-G654. doi: 10.1152/ajpgi.00342.2014. Epub 2016 Aug 11.

Monosodium glutamate inhibits the lymphatic transport of lipids in the rat.

Author information

1
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut; and.
2
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
3
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio tsopp@ucmail.uc.edu.

Abstract

It is not well understood how monosodium glutamate (MSG) affects gastrointestinal physiology, especially regarding the absorption and the subsequent transport of dietary lipids into lymph. Thus far, there is little information about how the ingestion of MSG affects the lipid lipolysis, uptake, intracellular esterification, and formation and secretion of chylomicrons. Using lymph fistula rats treated with the infusion of a 2% MSG solution before a continuous infusion of triglyceride, we show that MSG causes a significant decrease in both triglyceride and cholesterol secretion into lymph. Intriguingly, the diminished lymphatic transport of triglyceride and cholesterol was not caused by an accumulation of these labeled lipids in the intestinal lumen or in the intestinal mucosa. Rather, it is a result of increased portal transport in the animals fed acutely the lipid plus 2% MSG in the lipid emulsion. This is a first demonstration of MSG on intestinal lymphatic transport of lipids.

KEYWORDS:

cholesterol; chylomicron; enterocytes; monosodium glutamate; portal transport; triacylglycerol metabolism

PMID:
27514481
PMCID:
PMC5142199
DOI:
10.1152/ajpgi.00342.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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