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Cancer. 2018 Oct 15;124(20):3990-3999. doi: 10.1002/cncr.31584. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Gut microbiota-immune-brain interactions in chemotherapy-associated behavioral comorbidities.

Author information

1
The Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
2
Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
3
Center for Microbial Pathogenesis, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio.
4
Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

Abstract

Increasing scientific attention is focused on the gut-brain axis, including the ability of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to modulate central nervous system function. Changes in the intestinal microbiome can influence affective-like behavior, cognitive performance, fatigue, and sleep in rodents and humans. Patients with cancer who are receiving chemotherapy experience similar negative behavioral changes and concurrent GI symptoms. These chemotherapy comorbidities can be long-lasting and may reduce patients' quality of life and motivation to comply with treatment. This review summarizes the clinical and preclinical evidence supporting a role for the intestinal microbiome in mediating behavioral comorbidities through peripheral immune activation in patients with cancer who are receiving chemotherapy. In addition, evidence suggesting that targeted modification of the intestinal microbiome during cancer treatment could ameliorate associated behavioral comorbidities is reviewed.

KEYWORDS:

chemotherapy; cognition; gut microbiome; inflammation; mood

PMID:
29975400
DOI:
10.1002/cncr.31584

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