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Clin Oral Implants Res. 2006 Jun;17(3):237-43.

Bone healing and graft resorption of autograft, anorganic bovine bone and beta-tricalcium phosphate. A histologic and histomorphometric study in the mandibles of minipigs.

Author information

1
Department of Oral Surgery and Stomatology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Berne, Bern, Switzerland. simon.storgaard@jensen.mail.dk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose was to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the bone formation and graft resorption of two different bone substitutes used in both orthopedic and oral surgery, with autogenous bone as a positive control.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Three standardized bone defects were prepared in both mandibular angles of 12 adult minipigs. The defects were grafted with either autograft, anorganic bovine bone (ABB), or synthetic beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP). Sacrifice was performed after 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks for histologic and histomorphometric analysis.

RESULTS:

At 2 weeks, more new bone formation was seen in defects filled with autograft than with ABB (P approximately 0.0005) and beta-TCP (P approximately 0.002). After 4 weeks, there was no significant difference between beta-TCP and the two other materials. Defects grafted with ABB still exhibited less bone formation as compared with autograft (P approximately 0.004). At 8 weeks, more bone formation was observed in defects grafted with autograft (P approximately 0.003) and beta-TCP (P approximately 0.00004) than with ABB. No difference could be demonstrated between beta-TCP and autograft. beta-TCP resorbed almost completely over 8 weeks, whereas ABB remained stable.

CONCLUSION:

Both bone substitutes seemed to decelerate bone regeneration in the early healing phase as compared with autograft. All defects ultimately regenerated with newly formed bone and a developing bone marrow. The grafting materials showed complete osseous integration. Both bone substitutes may have a place in reconstructive surgery where different clinical indications require differences in biodegradability.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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