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See 1 citation in J Shoulder Elbow Surg 2010:

J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2010 Mar;19(2):209-15. doi: 10.1016/j.jse.2009.09.007. Epub 2009 Dec 7.

Different scapular kinematics in healthy subjects during arm elevation and lowering: glenohumeral and scapulothoracic patterns.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Dokkyo Medical University, Tochigi, Japan. y-yano@koriyama-h-coop.or.jp

Abstract

HYPOTHESIS:

The scapulothoracic (ST) joint affects glenohumeral (GH) joint function. We observed 3-dimensional scapular motions during arm elevation and lowering to identify the scapulohumeral rhythm in healthy subjects and to compare it between the dominant and nondominant arms.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Twenty-one healthy subjects participated in this study. Participants randomly elevated and lowered the arms in the scapular plane, and data were recorded by a computerized 3-dimensional motion analyzer at each 10 degrees increment.

RESULTS:

Of the 42 shoulders, 21 showed a greater ratio of GH motion relative to ST motion whereas the other 21 showed a smaller ratio of GH motion relative to ST motion. The angle of upward rotation of the scapula showed a statistically significant difference between both types. The mean maximum angles of upward rotation, posterior tilting, and internal rotation were 36.2 degrees +/- 7.0 degrees , 38.7 degrees +/- 5.7 degrees , and 36.8 degrees +/- 12.2 degrees , respectively. No significant difference was found in angles of 3 scapular rotations between the dominant and nondominant arms.

DISCUSSION:

These results indicate that there are 2 distinctly different scapulohumeral rhythms in healthy subjects but without a significant difference between dominant and nondominant arms. These findings should be referred to when one is interpreting kinematics in a variety of shoulder disorders.

PMID:
19995681
DOI:
10.1016/j.jse.2009.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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