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J Am Soc Nephrol. 2003 Nov;14(11):2948-57.

Survival of functionally anuric patients on automated peritoneal dialysis: the European APD Outcome Study.

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1
Charing Cross Hospital, London, United Kingdom. e.a.brown@imperial.ac.uk

Abstract

The European APD Outcome Study (EAPOS) is a 2-yr, prospective, multicenter study of the feasibility and clinical outcomes of automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) in anuric patients. A total of 177 patients were enrolled with a median age of 54 yr (range, 21 to 91 yr). Previous median total time on dialysis was 38 mo (range, 1.6 to 259 mo), and 36% of patients had previously been on hemodialysis for >90 d. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease were present in 17% and 46% of patients, respectively. The APD prescription was adjusted at physician discretion to aim for creatinine clearance (Ccrea) >/=60 L/wk per 1.73 m(2) and ultrafiltration (UF) >/=750 ml/24 h during the first 6 mo. Baseline solute transport status (D/P) was determined by peritoneal equilibration test. At 1 yr, 78% and 74% achieved Ccrea and UF targets, respectively; median drained dialysate volume was 16.2 L/24 h with 50% of patients using icodextrin. Baseline D/P was not related to UF achieved at 1 yr. At 2 yr, patient survival was 78% and technique survival was 62%. Baseline predictors of poor survival were age (>65 yr; P = 0.006), nutritional status (Subjective Global Assessment grade C; P = 0.009), diabetic status (P = 0.008), and UF (<750 ml/24 h; P = 0.047). Time-averaged analyses showed that age, Subjective Global Assessment grade C and diabetic status predicted patient survival with UF the next most significant variable (risk ratio, 0.5/L per d; P = 0.097). Baseline Ccrea, time-averaged Ccrea, and baseline D/P had no effect on patient or technique survival. This study shows that anuric patients can successfully use APD. Baseline UF, not Ccrea or membrane permeability, is associated with patient survival.

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