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Int J Adolesc Med Health. 2011 Dec 9;24(1):91-6. doi: 10.1515/ijamh.2012.013.

Is there a syndrome of bullying?

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Childrens's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA. jsrabste@cnmc.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated the existence of a psychosomatic disorder associated with bullying by delineating its health and safety and correlates, and defining the demographic characteristics of the USA adolescents affected by this condition.

METHODS:

This study was based on an analysis of USA data from the 1996 World Health Organization Health Behavior in School-aged Children survey. The survey provides nationally-representative, cross-sectional survey information on 9938 USA students in Grades 6-10. We examined those students who were involved in bullying as a victim and/or as a bully, with or without a self-reported cluster of depression, "bad mood", "feeling low", "feeling nervous" and sleeping difficulties, and one or more physical symptoms (headaches, stomach aches, back aches, dizziness).

RESULTS:

A cluster of physical and emotional symptoms linked to their participation in bullying as bullies and/or victims was reported by 9.5% of adolescents, with a higher frequency of 8th Grade students and a predominance of females. These students were 8.14 times more likely to hurt themselves on purpose and 4.20 times more likely to hurt others purposely than their peers who were not involved in bullying and did not suffer from a cluster of physical and emotional symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study may elicit further examination and debate about the existence of a nosological entity linked to bullying. Pending further research, the present results should support the need to ascertain participation in bullying, as a bully and/or as a victim, in all pediatric visits. Furthermore, there is a need to enquire about symptoms and risks related to this form of abuse.

PMID:
22909917
DOI:
10.1515/ijamh.2012.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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