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BMC Oral Health. 2018 Mar 13;18(1):41. doi: 10.1186/s12903-018-0500-z.

Investigating the association between stress, saliva and dental caries: a scoping review.

Author information

1
Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, 2001 McGill College Avenue, Montreal, QC, H3A 1G1, Canada. svetlana.tikhonova@mcgill.ca.
2
Department of Psychology, Concordia University, 7141 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, QC, H4B 1R6, Canada.
3
CHU Sainte-Justine & Université de Montreal, Montreal, Canada.
4
Faculty of Dentistry, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7, Canada.
5
Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5C1, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This scoping review addressed the question 'what do we know about stress-related changes in saliva and dental caries in general population?'

METHODS:

The review was conducted using electronic searches via Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and WoS. All published human studies with both observational and experimental designs were included. Two reviewers independently reviewed eligible articles and extracted the data. The studies' quality was assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool.

RESULTS:

Our search identified 232 reports, of which six were included in this review. All six studies were conducted in children and used salivary cortisol as stress marker. The studies varied by design, types of stressors, children's caries experience, methods of saliva collection. Four studies reported a positive association between saliva cortisol levels and caries (p < 0.05) while the other two reported no association (p > 0.05). The quality of the included studies was weak to moderate.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is lack of evidence about an association between stress-related changes in saliva and caries. Well-designed longitudinal studies with rigorous measurement technics for stress, saliva and dental caries are necessary. This will help to generate new insights into the multifactorial etiology of caries and provide evidence for a rational method for its control.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Dental caries; Depression; Psychological stress; Saliva

PMID:
29534715
PMCID:
PMC5851323
DOI:
10.1186/s12903-018-0500-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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