Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

Eur J Protistol. 2019 Feb;67:71-76. doi: 10.1016/j.ejop.2018.11.002. Epub 2018 Nov 14.

Intranuclear coccidiosis in tortoises - discovery of its causative agent and transmission.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology and Parasitology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Palackého tř. 1946/1, 612 42 Brno, Czech Republic. Electronic address: hofmannoval@vfu.cz.
2
Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, Branišovská 1760, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic.
3
Department of Pathology and Parasitology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Palackého tř. 1946/1, 612 42 Brno, Czech Republic.
4
Department of Pathology and Parasitology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Palackého tř. 1946/1, 612 42 Brno, Czech Republic; Biology Centre, Institute of Parasitology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Branišovská 31, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic; Central European Institute of Technology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Palackého tř. 1946/1, 612 42 Brno, Czech Republic.

Abstract

Intranuclear coccidiosis of testudines (known as TINC) is an emerging disease in chelonians. Although endogenous stages were repeatedly detected in various tissues, attempts to find the oocysts in faeces failed, leaving the question of the transmission and classification of the causative agent of TINC unresolved. We recorded small spherical oocysts (∼6-7 μm in diameter) of an eimeriid coccidium in faeces of a leopard tortoise (Stigmochelys pardalis). Sporulated oocysts were used for the experimental oral inoculation of juvenile coccidia-free tortoises representing 5 species (S. pardalis, Testudo graeca, T. hermanni, T. horsfieldii, and Geochelone sulcata). The oocysts' association with TINC was confirmed based on clinical signs, histopathological findings of intranuclear endogenous stages of the coccidium in many organs (including intestine), and by the partial 18S rDNA sequence analysis of the DNA isolated from organs of the experimentally infected animals and from a single naturally infected as well as from all experimentally infected tortoises. Breeding colonies of chelonians should be screened for this pathogen in order to prevent its further spread and unwanted introduction into endangered free-ranging chelonian populations.

KEYWORDS:

Eimeriid coccidium; TINC; Testudines

PMID:
30481662
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejop.2018.11.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center