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BJOG. 2016 Apr;123(5):730-7. doi: 10.1111/1471-0528.13625. Epub 2015 Sep 24.

Interpregnancy interval and perinatal outcomes across Latin America from 1990 to 2009: a large multi-country study.

Author information

1
Centro Rosarino de Estudios Perinatales (CREP), Rosario, Argentina.
2
UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research Development and Training in Human Reproduction (HRP), Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
3
Centro Latinoamericano de Perinatología (CLAP), Montevideo, Uruguay.
4
Women's Health Research Unit, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.

Erratum in

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the relationship of interpregnancy interval with maternal and offspring outcomes.

DESIGN:

Retrospective study with data from the Perinatal Information System database of the Latin American Centre for Perinatology and Human Development, Uruguay.

SETTING:

Latin America, 1990-2009.

POPULATION:

A cohort of 894 476 women delivering singleton infants.

METHODS:

During 1990-2009 the Perinatal Information System database of the Latin American Centre for Perinatology identified 894 476 women with defined interpregnancy intervals: i.e. the time elapsed between the date of the previous delivery and the first day of the last normal menstrual period for the index pregnancy. Using the interval 12-23 months as the reference category, multiple logistic regression estimated adjusted odds ratios (aORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of the association between various interval lengths and maternal and offspring outcomes.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Maternal death, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, puerperal infection, fetal death, neonatal death, preterm birth, and low birthweight.

RESULTS:

In the reference interval there was 0.05% maternal death, 1.00% postpartum haemorrhage, 2.80% pre-eclampsia, 0.15% eclampsia, 0.28% puerperal infection, 3.45% fetal death, 0.68% neonatal death, 12.33% preterm birth, and 9.73% low birthweight. Longer intervals had increased odds of pre-eclampsia (>72 months), fetal death (>108-119 months), and low birthweight (96-107 months). Short intervals of <12 months had increased odds of pre-eclampsia (aOR 0.80; 95% CI 0.76-0.85), neonatal death (aOR 1.18; 95% CI 1.08-1.28), and preterm birth (aOR 1.16; 95% CI 1.11-1.21). Statistically, the interval had no relationship with maternal death, eclampsia, and puerperal infection.

CONCLUSIONS:

A short interpregnancy interval of <12 months is associated with pre-eclampsia, neonatal mortality, and preterm birth, but not with other maternal or offspring outcomes. Longer intervals of >72 months are associated with pre-eclampsia, fetal death, and low birthweight, but not with other maternal or offspring outcomes.

TWEETABLE ABSTRACT:

A short interpregnancy interval of <12 months is associated with neonatal mortality and preterm birth.

KEYWORDS:

Fetal death; interpregnancy intervals; maternal death; perinatal; pre-eclampsia

PMID:
26399217
PMCID:
PMC4949506
DOI:
10.1111/1471-0528.13625
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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