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Oncogene. 2019 Aug;38(33):6095-6108. doi: 10.1038/s41388-019-0862-y. Epub 2019 Jul 9.

Identifying and targeting angiogenesis-related microRNAs in ovarian cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China.
3
Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. lsmangala@mdanderson.org.
4
Center for RNA Interference and Non-Coding RNAs, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. lsmangala@mdanderson.org.
5
Department of Physiology and Anatomy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA.
6
Center for RNA Interference and Non-Coding RNAs, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.
7
Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.
8
AM Biotechnologies, Houston, TX, USA.
9
Department of Pediatrics, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX, USA.
10
Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. asood@mdanderson.org.
11
Center for RNA Interference and Non-Coding RNAs, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. asood@mdanderson.org.
12
Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. asood@mdanderson.org.

Abstract

Current anti-angiogenic therapy for cancer is based mainly on inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway. However, due to the transient and only modest benefit from such therapy, additional approaches are needed. Deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been demonstrated to be involved in tumor angiogenesis and offers opportunities for a new therapeutic approach. However, effective miRNA-delivery systems are needed for such approaches to be successful. In this study, miRNA profiling of patient data sets, along with in vitro and in vivo experiments, revealed that miR-204-5p could promote angiogenesis in ovarian tumors through THBS1. By binding with scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SCARB1), reconstituted high-density lipoprotein-nanoparticles (rHDL-NPs) were effective in delivering miR-204-5p inhibitor (miR-204-5p-inh) to tumor sites to suppress tumor growth. These results offer a new understanding of miR-204-5p in regulating tumor angiogenesis.

PMID:
31289363
DOI:
10.1038/s41388-019-0862-y

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