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Int J Diabetol Vasc Dis Res. 2014 Feb 17;2(1). pii: 102.

Hyperglycemic Challenge and Distribution of Adipose Tissue in Obese Baboons.

Author information

1
Bioelectronics Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore Maryland.
2
Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland ; Research Imaging Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas ; Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX.
3
Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX ; Southwest National Primate Research Center, San Antonio, TX.
4
Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX.
5
Center for Laboratory Animal Breeding, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
6
Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX ; Kunming Biomedical International, Kunming, PR China.
7
Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX ; Department of Nutrition and Nutrition Research Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kannapolis, NC.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Blood glucose levels regulate the rate of insulin secretion, which is the body's mechanism for preventing excessive elevation in blood glucose. Impaired glucose metabolism and insulin resistance have been linked to excess body fat composition. Here, we quantify abdominal muscle and abdominal adipose tissue compartments in a large nonhuman primate, the baboon, and investigate their relationship with serum glucose response to a hyperglycemic challenge.

METHODS:

Five female baboons were fasted for 16 hours prior to 90 minute body imaging experiment that consisted of a 20-min baseline, followed by a bolus infusion of glucose (500mg/kg). The blood glucose was sampled at regular intervals. The total volumes of the muscle, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue were measured.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION:

We found that adipose tissue composition predicted fluctuations in glucose responses to a hyperglycemic challenge of a non-human primate. Animals with higher visceral adiposity showed significantly reduced glucose elimination. The glucose responses were positively correlated with body weight, visceral and muscle fat (p < 0.005). Polynomial regression analysis showed that body weight, visceral and muscle were significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results reveal the similarity between humans and baboons with respect to glucose metabolism and strengthen the utility of baboon for biomedical research.

KEYWORDS:

Body Fat Composition; Hyperglycemic Challenge; Perfusion Imaging

PMID:
25429366
PMCID:
PMC4241571

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