Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

J Pain Symptom Manage. 2014 May;47(5):849-59. doi: 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2013.06.002. Epub 2013 Aug 24.

How and why did a regional palliative care program lead to changes in a region? A qualitative analysis of the Japan OPTIM study.

Author information

1
Hamamatsu Cancer Center, Seirei Mikatahara General Hospital, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka, Japan.
2
Department of Palliative and Supportive Care, Palliative Care Team, and Seirei Hospice, Seirei Mikatahara General Hospital, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka, Japan. Electronic address: tmorita@sis.seirei.or.jp.
3
Center for Cancer Control and Information Services, National Cancer Center, Chuo, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Psycho-Oncology Division, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba, Japan.
5
Department of Palliative Medicine, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan.
6
Shirahige Clinic, Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan.
7
Department of Surgery, Tsuruoka Municipal Shonai Hospital, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan.
8
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Keio University, Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan.
9
Consortium for Home Health Care in Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan.
10
Division of Internal Medicine and Medical Oncology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Itabashi, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Improving palliative care is one of the major issues throughout the world.

OBJECTIVES:

The primary aim of this study was to explore how and why a regional palliative care program led to changes in a region.

METHODS:

As part of a nationwide mixed-methods study of a regional palliative care program, a qualitative study was performed with 101 health care professionals involved in the implementation of the program. In-depth interviews were done, focusing on perceived changes and the perceived reasons for the changes. We used thematic analyses.

RESULTS:

Seven themes were identified as follows: 1) improved communication and cooperation among regional health care professionals; 2) increased confidence in the system to care for cancer patients at home; 3) improved knowledge/skills, practice, and perception of palliative care; 4) contribution to self-growth; 5) wide variability in perceived changes in the knowledge and perception of patients, family members, and the general public; 6) wide variability in the perceived regionwide effects of the project; and 7) unresolved issues. Participants emphasized improved communication and cooperation among regional health care professionals and stated a variety of ways of how communication and cooperation influenced daily practice. The main reasons for changes included regionwide interdisciplinary conferences and informal interactions at a variety of meetings.

CONCLUSION:

This study advances understanding of how the regional palliative care program created a change in the region. The findings are useful for developing a conceptual framework and identifying key interventions to improve regional palliative care for clinicians, researchers, and policy makers.

KEYWORDS:

Region; community; home; palliative care; social capital

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center