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Br J Psychiatry. 2016 Mar;208(3):232-8. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.114.160192. Epub 2015 Nov 5.

Premature mortality in autism spectrum disorder.

Author information

1
Tatja Hirvikoski, PhD, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric Neuropsychiatry Unit, Center for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at Karolinska Institutet (KIND), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden and Habilitation and Health, Stockholm County Council, Sweden; Ellenor Mittendorfer-Rutz, PhD, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Marcus Boman, BSc, Henrik Larsson, PhD, Paul Lichtenstein, PhD, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Sven Bölte, PhD, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric Neuropsychiatry Unit, Center for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at Karolinska Institutet (KIND), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm and Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm County Council, Sweden Tatja.Hirvikoski@ki.se.
2
Tatja Hirvikoski, PhD, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric Neuropsychiatry Unit, Center for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at Karolinska Institutet (KIND), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden and Habilitation and Health, Stockholm County Council, Sweden; Ellenor Mittendorfer-Rutz, PhD, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Marcus Boman, BSc, Henrik Larsson, PhD, Paul Lichtenstein, PhD, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Sven Bölte, PhD, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Pediatric Neuropsychiatry Unit, Center for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at Karolinska Institutet (KIND), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm and Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stockholm County Council, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mortality has been suggested to be increased in autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

AIMS:

To examine both all-cause and cause-specific mortality in ASD, as well as investigate moderating role of gender and intellectual ability.

METHOD:

Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for a population-based cohort of ASD probands (n = 27,122, diagnosed between 1987 and 2009) compared with gender-, age- and county of residence-matched controls (n = 2,672,185).

RESULTS:

During the observed period, 24,358 (0.91%) individuals in the general population died, whereas the corresponding figure for individuals with ASD was 706 (2.60%; OR = 2.56; 95% CI 2.38-2.76). Cause-specific analyses showed elevated mortality in ASD for almost all analysed diagnostic categories. Mortality and patterns for cause-specific mortality were partly moderated by gender and general intellectual ability.

CONCLUSIONS:

Premature mortality was markedly increased in ASD owing to a multitude of medical conditions.

PMID:
26541693
DOI:
10.1192/bjp.bp.114.160192
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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