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BMC Res Notes. 2016 Jul 11;9:339. doi: 10.1186/s13104-016-2141-0.

Health literacy in pregnant women facing prenatal screening may explain their intention to use a patient decision aid: a short report.

Author information

1
Canada Research Chair in Shared Decision Making and Knowledge Translation, Public Health and Practice-Changing Research Group, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec Research Centre, Hôpital St-François d'Assise, 10 rue Espinay, D6-737, Quebec City, QC, G1L 3L5, Canada.
2
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, 1050, avenue de la Médecine, Quebec City, QC, Canada.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Roger Guindon Hall, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
4
Quebec Centre of Excellence on Aging, CHU de Québec Research Centre, 1050, chemin Sainte-Foy, Quebec City, QC, Canada.
5
Canada Research Chair in Shared Decision Making and Knowledge Translation, Public Health and Practice-Changing Research Group, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec Research Centre, Hôpital St-François d'Assise, 10 rue Espinay, D6-737, Quebec City, QC, G1L 3L5, Canada. France.Legare@mfa.ulaval.ca.
6
Department of Family Medicine and Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, 1050, avenue de la Médecine, Quebec City, QC, Canada. France.Legare@mfa.ulaval.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It has been suggested that health literacy may impact the use of decision aids (DAs) among patients facing difficult decisions. Embedded in the pilot test of a questionnaire, this study aimed to measure the association between health literacy and pregnant women's intention to use a DA to decide about prenatal screening. We recruited a convenience sample of 45 pregnant women in three clinical sites (family practice teaching unit, birthing center and obstetrical ambulatory care clinic). We asked participating women to complete a self-administered questionnaire assessing their intention to use a DA to decide about prenatal screening and assessed their health literacy levels using one subjective and two objective scales.

RESULTS:

Two of the three scales discriminated between levels of health literacy (three numeracy questions and three health literacy questions). We found a positive correlation between pregnant women's intention to use a DA and subjective health literacy (Spearman coefficient, Rho 0.32, P = 0.04) but not objective health literacy (Spearman coefficient, Rho 0.07, P = 0.65). Hence subjective health literacy may affect the intention to use a DA among pregnant women facing a decision about prenatal screening.

CONCLUSION:

Special attention should be given to pregnant women with lower health literacy levels to increase their intention to use a DA and ensure that every pregnant women can give informed and value-based consent to prenatal screening.

KEYWORDS:

Down syndrome; Health literacy; Patient decision aid; Patient involvement; Screening and diagnostic tests; Shared decision making

PMID:
27401163
PMCID:
PMC4940686
DOI:
10.1186/s13104-016-2141-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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