Format

Send to

Choose Destination

See 1 citation found by title matching your search:

Eur J Sport Sci. 2016;16(4):455-64. doi: 10.1080/17461391.2015.1063701. Epub 2015 Aug 25.

Greater basal skeletal muscle AMPKα phosphorylation in men than in women: Associations with anaerobic performance.

Author information

1
a Department of Physical Education , University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria , Campus Universitario de Tafira, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria , Spain.
2
b Genetic Unit , Childhood Hospital-Materno Infantil de Las Palmas , Las Palmas de Gran Canaria , Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study was designed to investigate the association of gender, fibre type composition, and anaerobic performance with the basal skeletal muscle signalling cascades regulating muscle phenotype.

DESIGN:

Muscle biopsies were obtained from 25 men and 10 women all young and healthy.

METHODS:

Protein phosphorylation of Thr(172)AMPKα, Ser(221)ACCβ, Thr(286)CaMKII as well as total protein abundance of PGC-1α, SIRT1, and CnA were measured by Western blot and anaerobic performance by the Wingate test.

RESULTS:

Percent type I myosin heavy chain (MHC I) was lower in men (37.1 ± 10.4 vs. 58.5 ± 12.5, P < .01). Total, free testosterone and free androgen index were higher in men (11.5, 36.6 and 40.6 fold, respectively, P < .01). AMPKα phosphorylation was 2.2-fold higher in men compared to women (P < .01). Total Ser(221)ACCβ and Thr(286)CaMKII fractional phosphorylation tended to be higher in men (P = .1). PGC1-α and SIRT1 total protein expression was similar in men and women, whereas CnA tended to be higher in men (P = .1). Basal AMPKα phosphorylation was linearly related to the percentage of MHC I in men (r = 0.56; P < .01), but not in women. No association was observed between anaerobic performance and basal phosphorylations in men and women, analysed separately.

CONCLUSION:

In summary, skeletal muscle basal AMPKα phosphorylation is higher in men compared to women, with no apparent effect on anaerobic performance.

KEYWORDS:

AMPK; anaerobic performance; gender; muscle phenotype; muscle signalling

PMID:
26305090
DOI:
10.1080/17461391.2015.1063701
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center